© 2016 by Arthur Lupia and Brendan Nyhan.

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Frequently asked questions

Who is eligible?

How do I enter?

What can I win?

Why should I enter?

Can my study use data from sources other than the ANES’s 2016 study of the general election?

Which journals are participating?

What are preregistration and preacceptance? How do they work?

What does a preaccepted article look like? What does a preregistration look like? 

How do I obtain access to the ANES questionnaires to design my preregistration?

Are analyses of restricted data from ANES eligible for the competition?

I don’t do experimental research. Why is preregistration relevant to me?

Can an article using ANES data be published in top journals?

Who is eligible?

University faculty or graduate students in any country or discipline are eligible to enter the competition.

How do I enter?

First, preregister your design in the Center for Open Science’s ERPC registry before the ANES data are released, which is expected in the last week of March 2017. After your design is registered, submit an article to a participating journal that includes the phrase “ERPC2016” in the title and a link to a design that was preregistered prior to the release of the ANES data. Your article can be submitted at any time; you do not have to wait until the data are released and will in fact have a higher priority for an award if you submit your article sooner. (See the rules for more details.)

What can I win?

Entries that are published in participating journals can win $2,000 and the opportunity to participate in a spotlight panel in an upcoming political science conference. (See the rules for more details.)

Why should I enter?
 

First, winners will not only have the opportunity to publish in some of the most prestigious journals in political science but to receive cash awards for those publications. Second, entries can be referred between participating journals, creating the opportunity for articles to be effectively considered by numerous journals in a relatively short period. A third benefit is that submitted articles will be considered in a truly results-blind fashion, increasing the opportunity for scholars to publish null results or other findings that may otherwise be difficult to publish. Finally, entering the competition demonstrates scholarly interest in promoting publication practices that increase research transparency and replicability. If this competition produces high-quality articles with important findings, including null findings, other journal editors and fields of study are likely to take notice and be more open to the preaccepted articles format and related innovations.

Can my study use data from sources other than the ANES’s 2016 study of the general election?

 

Yes! Scholars are welcome to submit articles that include data from other sources as well, including studies that have already been conducted or data that has already been collected by third parties. The only requirement for the competition is that the articles include one or more preregistered hypothesis tests or analyses that can be conducted using ANES data from the 2016 general election study. These data could, for instance, be used as a confirmatory hypothesis test of a previous exploratory finding (e.g., from the 2016 ANES pilot study or earlier work/other sources of data).

Which journals are participating?

 

Some of the most prestigious journals in political science have agreed to consider articles submitted as part of the competition:

What are preregistration and preacceptance? How do they work?

 

Watch our webinar explaining the process and answering common questions. Please also see Center for Open Science Preregistration Challenge FAQ and the Registered Reports FAQ on preregistration and Why Preacceptance on preacceptance. We note in particular that scholars may still conduct exploratory analyses that were not preregistered. The ERPC places no restrictions on the reporting of unregistered exploratory analyses – it simply requires that the Results section of the final article distinguishes those analyses that were pre-registered and confirmatory from those that were post hoc and exploratory. Ensuring a clear separation between confirmatory hypothesis testing and exploratory analysis is vital for preserving the evidential value of both forms of enquiry. 

What does a preaccepted article look like? What does a preregistration look like? 

Here is a collection of published registered reports, which give an idea of the structure generally expected, and here are generic guidelines for reviewers and authors about what to include/expect in a registered report submission. Here is the recent special issue of Comparative Political Studies using the format, which is the only recent precedent in political science. Another example are proposals filed with Time-Sharing Experiments in the Social Sciences, which can be accessed here. Finally, to see what standard practices are currently used in preregistrations, researchers might review the ungated designs posted at the EGAP website. 

How do I obtain access to the ANES questionnaires to design my preregistration?

 

Follow this link to learn more about the ANES questionnaires.

Are analyses of restricted data from ANES eligible for the competition?

Yes, data released by the ANES through its restricted data access program is eligible for inclusion. Please note that the data in question is restricted because it is associated with a slightly higher risk of respondent identifiability. Scholars who wish to use this data must complete the steps that the ANES requires for access.

I don’t do experimental research. Why is preregistration relevant to me?

 

Preregistration can also be used for observational research. It is especially well-suited to cases where a scholar can make an out-of-sample prediction about unavailable or unobserved data (e.g., ANES data for the upcoming 2016 general election before that data is released). Making an accurate prediction in these circumstances increases the credibility of an author’s findings by alleviating concerns about specification searches.  

Can an article using ANES data be published in top journals?

 

Yes! Influential articles that draw on ANES data continue to be published in highly prestigious journals. Here are just a few recent examples:

 

Claassen, Ryan L., and Benjamin Highton. 2008. "Policy Polarization among Party Elites and the Significance of Political Awareness in the Mass Public." Political Research Quarterly 62(3): 538-551.

 

Dow, Jay K. 2008. "Gender Differences in Political Knowledge: Distinguishing Characteristics-Based and Returns-Based Differences." Political Behavior 31(1): 117-136.

 

Dyck, Joshua J., and Edward L. Lascher. 2008. "Direct Democracy and Political Efficacy Reconsidered." Political Behavior 31(3): 401-427.

 

Enns, Peter K. 2014. "The Public's Increasing Punitiveness and Its Influence on Mass Incarceration in the United States." American Journal of Political Science 58(4): 857-872.

 

Evans, Geoffrey, and Mark Pickup. 2010. "Reversing the Causal Arrow: The Political Conditioning of Economic Perceptions in the 2000–2004 U.S. Presidential Election Cycle." Journal of Politics 72(4): 1236-1251.

 

Gadarian, Shana Kushner. 2010. "The Politics of Threat: How Terrorism News Shapes Foreign Policy Attitudes." Journal of Politics 72(2): 469-483.

 

Kalkan, Kerem, Geoffrey Layman, and Eric Uslaner. 2009. "‘Bands of Others’? Attitudes toward Muslims in Contemporary American Society." Journal of Politics 71.3 (2009): 847-862.

 

Kam, Cindy D. 2012. "Risk Attitudes and Political Participation." American Journal of Political Science 56(4): 817-836.

 

Luskin, Robert, and John Bullock. 2011. "‘Don’t Know’ Means ‘Don’t Know’: DK Responses and the Public’s Level of Political Knowledge." Journal of Politics 73(2): 547-557.

 

Miller, Patrick R. 2011. "The Emotional Citizen: Emotion as a Function of Political Sophistication." Political Psychology 32(4): 575-600.

 

Valentino, Nicholas A., Ted Brader, and Ashley E. Jardina. 2012. "Immigration Opposition Among U.S. Whites: General Ethnocentrism or Media Priming of Attitudes About Latinos?" Political Psychology 34(2): 149-166.

 

Valentino, Nicholas A., Ted Brader, Eric W. Groenendyk, Krysha Gregorowicz, and Vincent L. Hutchings. 2011. "Election Night’s Alright for Fighting: The Role of Emotions in Political Participation." Journal of Politics 73(1): 156-170.

 

(As we note above, scholars have the option to combine ANES survey data with other types of data sources or research designs to strengthen the contribution of their submission.)